Bush Walks

A selection of some of the best bush walks in and around Sydney and New South Wales, including maps, pictures, highlights and characteristics.

Sydney bush walks

Sydney is very well known because of its beautiful coastline, but Australia’s most beautiful city is in fact also home to some of the best bush walks hikers could wish for. What’s great is that you don’t actually have to go far away from the city to enjoy some native bushland.

Most would assume that you’d need to go west to the Blue Mountains or south to the Royal National Park in order to escape the city and do a bush walk. But actually, some of the best bush walks can be found in and around Sydney Harbour. Balls Head Reserve in Waverton for example, is only a short hop from the city.

Other great Sydney bush walks are Lake Parramatta Reserve, the Manly Dam walk, the Narrabeen Lagoon Trail and the walking trails around Wentworth Falls in the Blue Mountains.

10 Great Bush Walks in and around Sydney

To give you some ideas and inspiration, here are 10 of the best bush walks in and around Sydney:

1. Cowan to Brooklyn

The 14km hike from Cowan station to Brooklyn station is part of the Great North Walk. One of the highlights on this trail is picturesque Jerusalem Bay. Read more…

2. Taronga Zoo to Balmoral Beach

The 6.5km trail between Taronga Zoo and Balmoral Beach swirls its way through bushland past secluded beaches, picturesque bays, impressive lookouts and historical sights. Read more…

3. Resolute Loop Trail

The Resolute Loop Trail takes you through a beautiful part of the Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park with West Head Lookout and Resolute Beach as the highlights. Read more…

4. Royal National Park Coast Track

The famous Coast Track in the Royal National Park is a 26km scenic trail of that follows the coastline between Bundeena and Otford. Read more…

5. Narrabeen Lagoon Trail

The Narrabeen Lagoon trail is a stunning 8km circuit track around Narrabeen Lakes, popular with hikers, joggers and cyclists. Read more…

6. The Forest Path

The Forest Path is a relatively easy but pretty 4.5km bushwalk in the Royal National Park that loops around Forest Island following the Hacking River. Read more…

7. Manly Dam Walk

The Manly Dam walk is a panoramic 7.3km circuit trail around Manly Dam that is still a bit of a hidden gem. Enjoy nature at its best only a few kilometres away from Sydney CBD. Read more…

8. Lake Parramatta Reserve

Hiking in the Lake Parramatta Reserve is a great day out, as you walk through 75ha of bushland around an idyllic lake with a decommissioned dam. Read more…

9. Grand Canyon Walk

Often regarded as the most impressive walking trail in the Blue Mountains, the Grand Canyon Walk will leave you in awe as you hike through lush rainforest with several waterfalls and creek crossings. Read more…

10. Spit Bridge to Manly Walk

The famous 10km Spit to Manly walking trail is not just a fabulous coastal walk, it’s also great for bushwalking fanatics. Read more…

Have you done a beautiful bush walk in Sydney or New South Wales that is not included here? Let us know and we will try and add it to our selection.

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Wentworth Falls Hiking Guide – Walking Tracks and Lookout Points

Wentworth Falls is one of the most popular bushwalking destinations in the Blue Mountains region. The name Wentworth Falls refers to the famous 3-tiered, 187m high waterfall, but it is also the name of the town where the waterfall is located.

There are lots of different walking tracks to choose from in the Wentworth Falls area, some very short and others quite long and challenging. In addition to walks, there are also several lookout points spread out across Wentworth Falls that offer spectacular views.

Deciding where to go and which walking track to conquer in Wentworth Falls can be quite a challenge in itself. This hiking guide provides more clarity around the walks and lookouts in and around Wentworth Falls to help you plan your day out in the Blue Mountains.

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8 Best Walking Tracks in Royal National Park

Established in 1879, the Royal National Park is Australia’s oldest and the world’s second oldest national park. Originally named National Park, it was officially renamed in 1955 after Queen Elizabeth II passed through on her way to Wollongong during her 1954 Australia tour.

From coastal heath, lookout points and waterfalls to beaches, bushland and natural swimming pools, this 15,000 hectares large park has something for everyone. One of the best things about the Royal National Park is that it is very close to the city and very easily accessible, by car as well as by public transport.

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6 Best Walking Tracks in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

Established in 1894, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is Australia’s second oldest national park, 15 years younger than Sydney’s Royal National Park.

Located only 25km north of the Sydney CBD, Ku-ring-gai Chase is a popular weekend recreation destination for Sydney residents as well as for tourists.

Measuring a generous 15,000 hectares, the park is characterised by thriving rainforest, rocky cliffs, mangroves, Aboriginal sites, picnic areas, secluded beaches, lookout points, mountain biking trails and various walking tracks.

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Ruined Castle Walk Including the Golden Stairs

Starting at the infamous Golden Stairs, the Ruined Castle Walk is a popular bushwalking track near Katoomba that brings you to one of the most unique landmarks in the Blue Mountains.

Enjoy scenic views of Jamison Valley, the Three Sisters, Castle Head and Mount Solitary as you hike through lush thriving rainforest.

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8 Best Walking Tracks in the Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains is one of the most popular tourist and weekend-getaway destinations in New South Wales. Just over an hour away from Sydney, this World Heritage listed area is home to a large number of beautiful walking tracks, waterfalls, deep valleys and canyons, rainforests and numerous lookout points with breathtaking views.

Several different theories exist around the blue haze that often hovers over the mountains. It is commonly believed that this haze is caused by rays of light reflecting on dust particles, water vapour and organic chemicals emitted by eucalyptus trees.

This dense eucalyptus vegetation was also one of the reasons the Greater Blue Mountains Area was officially listed as a World Heritage site in 2000 by UNESCO.

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